Skip to main content

About your Search

20130204
20130212
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
the weapons. >> you delivered a major foreign policy today at the heritage foundation. well thought out speech on national security issues. why now? why did you decide to do it? because you knew that it was going to jump-start the speculation you want to establish foreign policy credentials for a possible run in 2016. >> you know, i just joined the foreign relations committee. i wanted to spell out what my mission is for the foreign policy. it's a unique position and one that needs to be expressed. we often have two polar extremes and really just one, for the most part, that we're everywhere you will a of the time. the other extreme is that it would be nowhere any of the time and that would be isolationism. there's a realistic approach somewhere in the middle and it would involve containment. i talked a lot about george kennan who may be the most famous diplomats, thought to be one of the chief architects of containment and i think there's some of ththat may apply to rad islam. it's an thet cal to freedom and has to be opposed at various parts around the world but i don't think the standard ap
for not leaking. and what we also see in this is that foreign policy is really run from the white house and not from anywhere else. this is a very white house centric national security team and i think that the president is, of course, first among equals. if you look at those people up on the screen, wolf, it is the president of the united states who made that decision on osama bin laden, hillary clinton and leon panetta wanted to arm the rebels and it was the president who decided differently. so it's very much center data. >> the president of the united states, who makes a decision over rejecting the advice, in the end it's up to him. >> of course it's up to him. what modern presidents center their policy in the white house and if the president is making decisions about his to him is who are the people next to him? and cabinets over the last decade or two, you have strong members of cabinets, no doubt about it. but the policymaking, more and more centered out of that oval office and out of the people who are in that small piece of real estate right around the president. >> what's the
will not make new policy, but, rather, advocate for existing positions. he's going to spend less time on foreign policy than on the economy but that's always the case in his state of the union speeches. on those fronts, expect him to address the drawdown in afghanistan, the u.s. relationship with china and also announce the start of a u.s./european union trade negotiation. big picture, wolf, it sounds like when it comes to republicans, he'll sort of have a club in one hand and olive branch in the other. >> it sounds like he's going to be emphasizing many of the themes he emphasized in the inaugural address. how will this one substantively be a whole lot different? >> his aides say to me that one was the philosophical statement of his beliefs. this one puts molcy meat on the bones. i'm told he will also talk about gay rights, women's rights and climate change. the big difference from the inaugural is the president views tomorrow night as his big opportunity to speak to the american people about the stakes in those across the board budget cuts looming at the end of the month and make his economic
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)